SEASON REPERTOIRE

LINCOLN CENTER SEASON

PAUL TAYLOR AMERICAN MODERN DANCE
at
LINCOLN CENTER
October 29 – November 17

Paul Taylor American Modern Dance will return to the
David H. Koch Theater at Lincoln Center from October 29 to November 17, with

Paul Taylor: Celebrate the Dancemaker

featuring the Paul Taylor Dance Company in a tribute to its founder, who died in 2018.
The engagement marks PTAMD’s first Lincoln Center Season under Artistic Director Michael Novak.
Highlights include 19 Taylor masterworks, and commissioned works created on PTDC by Kyle Abraham (World Premiere)
and Guest Resident Choreographers Margie Gillis and Pam Tanowitz (Lincoln Center Premieres).

Taylor Season Passes (3+ performances) are available now. Purchase yours today by clicking on the button below.

TAYLOR SEASON PASS

Or purchase single tickets using the button below.

SINGLE TICKETS

Groups of 8 or more can save up to 30% off!

GROUPS of 8 PLUS

TAYLOR REPERTOIRE

photo: Paul B. Goode

Music:  G.F. Handel
Costumes:  Gene Moore
Lighting:  Jennifer Tipton
Date First Performed:  May 30, 1978
Quote:  “Airs is a new and distinctive vintage, of mellowness and classic finish that give it a sublime autumnal glow. Incredibly diversified and complex. The whole work is a treasure.”
Alan M. Kriegsman, Washington Post

photo: Whitney Browne

Music:  George Frideric Handel
Set and Costumes:  George Tacet
Lighting:  Thomas Skelton
Date First Performed:  August 4, 1962
Quote:  “Aureole, perhaps his first major success, was the first time Taylor combined his loping antelope style of movement with baroque music, and its grace and individuality instantly spun into orbit throughout the world of dance. There is an interestingly variegated luminosity of spirit that recalls fluffy clouds on Shakespeare’s summer’s day.”
– Clive Barnes, New York Post

Paul B. Goode

Music:  Francis Poulenc
Costumes:  Santo Loquasto
Lighting:  Jennifer Tipton
Date First Performed:  November 21, 2008
Quote:  “Set to Francis Poulenc’s choral “Gloria,” the dance was inspired by the life and work of 19th Century American writer Walt Whitman, who revered the body and soul as one and who famously loved all with equal ardor. It depicts the experiences of an artist described in a line from Whitman’s “Leaves of Grass”: “I am the poet of the body and I am the poet of the soul.” Scenes from his life include watching youngsters at play, and tending to the afflicted just as Whitman nursed wounded soldiers during the Civil War. After his own mortality is foretold, the poet bids poignant farewell to those who love him. He is then embraced by a benevolent feminine spirit with “the sure-enwinding arms of cool-enfolding death.””The best new choreography in 2008. Deeply moving… a work of philosophic as well as dramatic power. Mr. Taylor ranks among the great war poets… One of the great achievements of his long career and one of the most eloquently textured feats of his singular imagination.”
Alastair Macaulay, New York Times

photo: Paul B. Goode

Music:  Songs from the Great Depression
Set and Costumes:  Santo Loquasto
Lighting:  Jennifer Tipton
Date First Performed:  April 10, 2001
Quote:  “The once mighty jumped to their deaths from skyscrapers, former millionaires sold apples on street corners, and every metropolis sprouted Shantytowns. America was in the grip of the Great Depression – but rather than dwell on its terrible effects, popular culture from Tin Pan Alley to Hollywood celebrated the nation’s can-do spirit. Paul Taylor recalls the valiant souls of the ’30s with a masterwork from his Americana series. He peoples his Shantytown with Vaudevillians and Doughboys, hookers and showgirls, all eking out a meager existence on the streets of the city. Music hall hoofers recall their heyday, down-and-out couples jitterbug down Park Avenue, a pimp continues to hawk his wares, and a newsgirl pretends to slay the big bad wolf that is the Depression. Sections set to “The Boulevard Of Broken Dreams” – the era’s great torch song – and “Brother, Can You Spare A Dime?” – its enduring anthem – powerfully illustrate the tragedy of shattered hopes and dreams.“[Taylor is] still making waves in the dance world with his quirky, beautiful, dark, inventive and visceral work. Black Tuesday, set to songs from the Great Depression, could be added to a file titled, ‘Paul Taylor’s Master Works’. All elements, combined to provide the ultimate experience of seeing a world come to life before your eyes…“
– Susan Broili, Durham Herald-Sun

photo: Paul B. Goode

Music:  Claude Debussy
Costumes:  Santo Loquasto
Lighting:  James F. Ingalls
Date First Performed:  November 6, 2009
Quote:  “The dancers, beautifully adult and near naked in trim black underwear, passed through transient scenes of sexual desire, emotional perplexity and more… Every emotion and meeting seems young, pristine, mysterious.”
— Alastair Macaulay, New York Times

 

photo: Paul B. Goode

Music:  Arcangelo Corelli, Henry Cowell, and Malloy Miller
Costumes:  Women’s Costumes by Scott Barrie, Headpieces by John Rawlings
Lighting:  Jennifer Tipton
Date First Performed:  June 9, 1976
Quote:  “Man is a social animal,” said Spinoza. Just below the surface of humans’ civilized veneer lurks an animal nature that cannot be ignored. The scene is a cotillion ball where members of high society are dressed in formal attire – the gentlemen in tailcoats and the ladies wearing gowns and mirrored headpieces. A baroque score vies for dominance with urgent, percussive 20th-Century music, reflecting the struggle between our gentler and more savage natures. As primitive impulses emerge, the women plant seeds and bear progeny, while the men seem no longer to wear tails but bear tails. They prance and stalk on all fours, and their totemic friezes suggest the prehistoric ancestors from whom we have descended. Although the dance ends on a triumphant note with social structures intact, it has become clear that we are not separate from animals, we are animals.“A sharp comedy of manners [about] the conflicting natures within people and, more specifically, the darker side that surfaces under the veneer of gentility. Revealing their true selves, the dancers turn humorously grotesque. The writhe as well as waltz, they crawl as well as glide. There’s so much movement-invention that it is hard to take everything in.”
– Anna Kisselgoff, New York Times

photo: Paul B. Goode

Music:  Songs sung by the Andrews Sisters
Costumes:  Santo Loquasto
Lighting:  Jennifer Tipton
Date First Performed:  June 20, 1991
Quote:  “Just as America began to emerge from the Depression at the dawn of the 1940s, the country was drawn into the Second World War. In a seminal piece of Americana, Paul Taylor recalls that turbulent era through the hit songs of the Andrews Sisters. Although the songs depict a nation surging with high spirits, millions of men were bidding farewell to wives or girlfriends and many would never return from battle. The dance focuses on such poignant dualities. Young lovers lindy, jitterbug and polka in a near manic grasp for happiness while in the background shadowy figures – soldiers – fall dead. Among the sections of the dance, the one choreographed to “Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy (of Company B)” is carefree until the moment the bugler is shot; the one set to “I Can Dream, Can’t I?” tells of a young lady’s affections for a soldier an ocean away who, for his part, reaches out to a comrade in arms. The dance ends just as it began, with “Bei Mir Bist du Schön” – but the world has clearly changed.“Evokes the exuberant rhythms of the ’40’s as well as the grim and persistent shadow of war. But even more vividly, it honors Taylor’s magnificent dancers. Some of the most glorious dancing to be seen anywhere…”
– Laura Shapiro, Newsweek

photo: Paul B. Goode

Music:  Eric Ewazen
Set and Costumes:  William Ivey Long
Lighting:  James F. Ingalls
Date First Performed:  March 7, 2018
Quote:  “… interesting, rubbing against the grain of the music. And these flashes irradiate particular dancers: a harshness in the lucid Michael Novak; a roiling distress in Heather McGinley; a soft explosiveness in Alex Clayton, who joined the troupe last year and is already a standout.

photo: Paul B. Goode

photo: Paul B. Goode

photo: Paul B. Goode

Music:  Johann Sebastian Bach
Costumes:  John Rawlings
Lighting:  Jennifer Tipton
Date First Performed:  March 1, 1975
Quote: “When I left the theater… I was thinking that I’d seen a classic of American dance. It confers a mythic dimension on ordinary aspects of our daily lives – it’s unfaked folk art. The dancers, crashing wave upon wave into those falls, have a happy insane spirit that recalls a unique moment in American life – the time we did the school play or we were ready to drown at a swimming meet. The last time most of us were happy in that way.”
– Arlene Croce, The New Yorker

photo: Paul B. Goode

photo: Paul B. Goode

Music:  Astor Piazzolla and Jerzy Peterburshsky
Set and Costumes:  Santo Loquasto
Lighting:  Jennifer Tipton
Date First Performed:  June 12, 1997
Quote:  “Stunning. Taylor looks at the attitudes implicit of the tango – as sexual game, as social identity – and reshapes them. Seethes and flares with sexuality and develops a huge erotic charge. One of Taylor’s most astonishing (even for him) creations.”
– Clement Crisp, Financial Times of London

photo: Jack Mitchell

Music:  Evelyn Lohoeffer de Boeck (commissioned score)
Costumes:  Alex Katz
Lighting:  William Ritman
Date First Performed:  March 31, 1965

photo: Paul B. Goode

Music:  Iannis Xenakis
Set and Costumes:  Alex Katz
Lighting:  Jennifer Tipton
Date First Performed:  May 7, 1969

photo: Paul B. Goode

Music: Clarence Jackson
Set and Costumes: Alex Katz
Lighting: Thomas Skelton
Date First Performed: August 10, 1963
Quote: “It’s been in hibernation for 40 years! And what a work it is. Made immediately after Taylor’s first great hit, the buoyant and sunlit Aureole, Scudorama – dark and desolate – was a deliberate rebuke to Aureole’s joyous optimism. It’s a view not of hell, though, but of purgatory; hell was to follow… Almost no one in the audience had ever seen Scudorama, and it was a revelation – a blazing declaration of Taylor’s talent. You can see in it not only his future but aspects of his past.”
– Robert Gottlieb, New York Observer

photo: Paul B. Goode

Music:  Edward Elgar (and recorded loon calls)
Set and Costumes:  Alex Katz
Lighting:  Jennifer Tipton
Date First Performed:  April 6, 1983
Quote:  “Mr. Taylor’s deeply moving meditation on war, on men with women, on men with men, on loss, on memory is one of the few great dance works of the past quarter-century…Delicately presented, achingly sad…I’m always startled to meet people who aren’t moved to tears by it.”
– Robert Gottlieb, New York Observer

photo: Paul B. Goode

Music:  Donald York (commissioned score)
Costumes:  Santo Loquasto
Lighting:  Jennifer Tipton
Date First Performed:  April 21, 1987
Quote:  “Full of utterly brilliant and seemingly disconnected shards of choreography. A full-throttle exercise in physicality, loose-limbed and speedy… It simply continues to increase its velocity, its sense of elfin delight, as the dance goes by. Leaves the audience gasping for more.”
– Barry Johnson, The Oregonian

photo: Paul B. Goode

Music:  Amilcare Ponchielli
Costumes:  Santo Loquasto
Lighting:  Jennifer Tipton
Date First Performed:  April 15, 2006
Quote:  “Taylor’s funniest work to date dazzles with bright-spirited, belly-laugh humor [turning] Shakespeare’s bitter play of love and betrayal into a hoot. At the root of his humor lies his astute observation of human nature involving romantic matters in which mere humans appear as stumbling, clueless oafs.”
– Susan Broili, Durham Herald-Sun

PTAMD COMMISSIONS

New work by Kyle Abraham (PTAMD Commission 2019)

Photo coming soon!

Performed by: Paul Taylor Dance Company
Choreographer: Kyle Abraham
Music: Shirley Horn
World Premiere: October 30, 2019*
New York Premiere: October 30, 2019*
*Subject to change

photo: Paul B. Goode

Performed by: Paul Taylor Dance Company
Choreographer: Pam Tanowitz
Music: Johann Sebastian Bach Violin Concerto in A Minor & Oboe Sonata in G Minor
Costumes: Harriet Jung and Reid Bartelme
Lighting: Jennifer Tipton
Date First Performed: June 7, 2019
Quote:  “Ms. Tanowitz works against Taylor’s conventions, even as she cleverly borrows from his vocabulary and exaggerates its features.”
, New York Times

photo: Paul B. Goode

Performed by: Paul Taylor Dance Company
Choreographer: Margie Gillis
Music: Johann Sebastian Bach The Art of Fugue, Movements 3, 12 & 17
Costumes: Santo Loquasto
Lighting: Jennifer Tipton
Date First Performed: June 8, 2019
Quote:  “It will be necessary to reintegrate with our wildness, respecting our natural world, if we are to remain on this planet.”
– Margie Gillis

Taylor Season Passes (3+ performances) are available now. Purchase yours today by clicking on the button below.

TAYLOR SEASON PASS

Or purchase single tickets using the button below.

SINGLE TICKETS